Guide for Authors

Guide for Authors

Thank you for submitting your manuscript to Contemporary Language Teaching. Following the instructions detailed below ensure that your paper can go through peer review and publication smoothly. You are kindly asked to submit your manuscript through the journal’s website. Please note that submission by email is not currently possible. Please read the guidelines below before submitting your manuscript.

 

Peer Review Process

Contemporary Language Teaching applied a double-blind review process. The manuscript are first reviewed by one of the reviewers for appropriate style and focus. If approved, they are then transferred to at least two anonymous reviewers from the editorial board or external reviewers. The first decision is normally issues 6 weeks after the manuscript being submitted by the author.

 

Preparing Your Manuscript

Structure

Please note that your manuscript should be prepared in the following order: title page, abstract, keywords, introduction, literature review, method (including setting, participants, materials, instruments, data analysis and procedure), results, discussion, acknowledgments, conflict of interest, references, appendices (If applicable), table(s) with caption(s) (on individual pages), figures; figure captions (as a list).

 

Word Limit

The manuscripts submitted to Contemporary Language Teaching are normally around 7000 words. The authors are encouraged to indicate the word count in the manuscript.

 

Style and Formatting Guidelines

Papers should be submitted in MS Word format. To help you prepare your manuscript, the following formatting template is provide. Please click here to download the template.

Use double quotation marks for short quotations. Long quotations are indented without quotation marks.

 

References

The references should be organized based on the latest version Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition)

 

General Guidelines

In-text references should immediately follow the title, word, or phrase to which they are directly relevant, rather than appearing at the end of long clauses or sentences. In-text references should always precede punctuation marks. Below are examples of using in-text citation.

Author's name in parentheses:

One study found that the most important element in comprehending non-native speech is familiarity with the topic (Gass & Varonis, 1984).

Author's name part of narrative:

Gass and Varonis (1984) found that the most important element in comprehending non-native speech is familiarity with the topic.

Group as author:
First citation: (American Psychological Association [APA], 2015)
Subsequent citation: (APA, 2015)

Multiple works: (separate each work with semi-colons)

Research shows that listening to a particular accent improves comprehension of accented speech in general (Gass & Varonis, 1984; Krech Thomas, 2004).

Direct quote: (include page number and place quotation marks around the direct quote)

One study found that “the listener's familiarity with the topic of discourse greatly facilitates the interpretation of the entire message” (Gass & Varonis, 1984, p. 85).

Gass and Varonis (1984) found that “the listener’s familiarity with the topic of discourse greatly facilitates the interpretation of the entire message” (p. 85).

Note: For direct quotations of more than 40 words, display the quote as an indented block of text without quotation marks and include the authors’ names, year, and page number in parentheses at the end of the quote. For example:

This suggests that familiarity with nonnative speech in general, although it is clearly not as important a variable as topic familiarity, may indeed have some effect. That is, prior experience with nonnative speech, such as that gained by listening to the reading, facilitates comprehension. (Gass & Varonis, 1984, p. 77).

 

Using In-text Citation

Include an in-text citation when you refer to, summarize, paraphrase, or quote from another source. For every in-text citation in your paper, there must be a corresponding entry in your reference list.

APA in-text citation style uses the author's last name and the year of publication, for example: (Field, 2005). For direct quotations, include the page number as well, for example: (Field, 2005, p. 14). For sources such as websites and e-books that have no page numbers, use a paragraph number. More information on citing sources without pagination is given on the APA Style web page.

Example paragraph with in-text citation

A few researchers in the linguistics field have developed training programs designed to improve native speakers' ability to understand accented speech (Derwing, Rossiter, & Munro, 2002; Thomas, 2004). Their training techniques are based on the research described above indicating that comprehension improves with exposure to non-native speech. Derwing et al. (2002) conducted their training with students preparing to be social workers, but note that other professionals who work with non-native speakers could benefit from a similar program.

 

Citing Articles

Note: Citations with more than one line of text should have a hanging indent of 1/2 inch or 5 spaces.

Important Elements:

  • Author (last name, initials only for first & middle names)
  • Date of publication of article (year and month for monthly publications; year, month and day for daily or weekly publications)
  • Title of article (capitalize only the first word of title and subtitle, and proper nouns)
  • Title of publication in italics (i.e., Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Newsweek, New York Times)
  • Volume number in italics and issue number, if given
  • Page numbers of article
  • For articles retrieved online, include URL or DOI, if available

Article in a monthly magazine:

Swedin, E. G.  (2006, May/June). Designing babies: A eugenics race with China? The Futurist, 40, 18-21.

Article in an online magazine:

Romm, J. (2008, February 27). The cold truth about climate change. Salon.com. Retrieved from http://www.salon.com/2008/02/27/global_warming_deniers/

Article in a weekly magazine:

Will, G. F. (2004, July 5). Waging war on Wal-Mart. Newsweek, 144, 64.

Article in a daily newspaper:

Dougherty, R. (2006, January 11). Jury convicts man in drunk driving death. Centre Daily Times, p. 1A.

Article in a scholarly journal with DOI:

Blattner, J., & Bacigalupo, A. (2007). Using emotional intelligence to develop executive leadership and team and organizational development. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 59(3), 209-219. doi:10.1037/1065-9293.59.3.209

Book Review:

Rifkind, D. (2005, April 10). Breaking their vows. [Review of the book The mermaid chair, by S.M. Kidd]. Washington Post, p. T6.

 

Citing Books

Note: Citations with more than one line of text should have a hanging indent of 1/2 inch or 5 spaces.

Important Elements:

  • Author (last name, initials only for first & middle names)
  • Publication date
  • Title (in italics; capitalize only the first word of title and subtitle, and proper nouns)
  • Place of publication
  • Publisher
  • For books retrieved online, include URL

Print book:

Goodpaster, K. E., Nash, L. L., & de Bettignies, H. (2006). Business ethics: Policies and persons (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

Book by a group author:

American Medical Association. (2004). American Medical Association family medical guide (4th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Article or chapter within an edited book:

Winne, P. H. (2001). Self-regulated learning viewed from models of information processing. In B.J. Zimmerman & D.H. Schunk (Eds.), Self-regulated learning and academic achievement (2nd ed., pp. 160-192). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Translation:

Tolstoy, L. (2006). War and peace. (A. Briggs, Trans.). New York, NY: Viking. (Original work published 1865).

Electronic book:

Post, E. (1923). Etiquette in society, in business, in politics, and at home. New York, NY: Funk & Wagnalls. Retrieved from http://www.bartleby.com/95/

Entry in an online reference work:

Rey, G. (2006). Behaviorism. In D. M. Borchert (Ed.), Encyclopedia of philosophy. (2nd ed.). Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/

E-Reader book (such as Kindle):

Tetlock, P.E., & Gardner, D. (2015). Superforecasting: The art and science of prediction [Kindle Paperwhite version]. Retrieved from Amazon.com

Dictionary entry:

Hipster. (n.d.) In Oxford English Dictionary. Retrieved from www.oed.com.